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Rockbare are raiders of precious but wayward vineyards, planted to outdated standards of viticulture, sadly unviable for large scale winemaking. These are however, precisely the nature of site that Rockbare choose to retain. Winemaker Tim Burvill worked at Wynns and Penfolds, where he refined his style alongside some of the best winemakers in the nation's history. Establishing his own label, he embarked upon a secret project to acquire parcels of prodigal Barossa vine. With a backbone of fruit grown to some of the oldest sites in Australia, much of Rockbare's fruit comes off vines a century or more of age. The intense power and complexity of Rockbare's resplendent range of wines are complimented by.. Precious & prodigal parcels of the barossa»
W. J. Seabrook & Son have been a part of the Australian wine industry since 1878. Many an ancient storefront, right across the country, are still emblazoned with the family label. Fifth generation vigneron Hamish Seabrook drew inspiration from time well spent at other illustrious estates, establishing his own personal repute as a distinguished winemaker during tours of duty at Bests Great Western, Brown Brothers Milawa and the Barossa's exalted Dorrien. A key to the long lived excellence of the Seabrook trademark has been a canny selection of exceptional vineyards fruit. Hamish hand chooses his harvests from the finest vineyards in the land, just as his forefathers did. He is a proud recipient of the.. Salutations to seabrook»
Xavier Bizot can make wine anywhere he pleases, he is a Bollinger and grew up amongst the Vignobles Superieurs of Champagne. Bizot has chosen to make wine alongside Brian Croser's family, from grapes harvested off three magnificent sites, on two paradoxically varied terrains. Planted to the salubrious Terra rosa soils atop an invaluable archeological dig at Wrattonbully, rich with the undisturbed fossils of ancient Cenozoic sea animals, Crayeres Vineyard was established right across the road from Tapanappa's illustrious Whalebone. The weather here is astonishingly similar to Bordeaux and makes an awesome Cabernet Franc. Xavier Bizot and Lucy Croser are also fortunate to take their pick of properties in.. The twin tales of terre a terre»
Yering Station
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Yering Station
Yering Station is Victoria's first ever vineyard, planted in 1838 in the heart of the Yarra Valley

The Scottish-born Ryrie brothers ventured into the Yarra Valley as they moved their cattle south from Sydney. Taking up a grazing license of 43 000 acres, they named the property Yering, its Aboriginal name. The Ryrie's planted two varieties, the Black Cluster of Hamburg and a white grape variety called Sweetwater. During the early 1850s they returned to Sydney and Paul de Castella took ownership of Yering Station, developing the property from what remained primarily a cattle station into a landmark of winemaking in Victoria.

Yering Station

During the 1850s Yering Station began to take shape. Paul de Castella extended the vineyards and cultivated the varieties with new cuttings imported from France. In 1861 Yering Station won the Argus Gold Cup for the best Victorian vineyard. De Castella advocated for strong communication between vineyard and winery. In 1889 Yering Station won a Grand Prix at the Universal Exhibition in Paris. Only fourteen such awards were ever granted internationally. The winery received the sole award for a wine produced in the southern hemisphere.

After changing hands several times throughout the early-to-mid 1900s, Yering Station was purchased by the Rathbone family in 1996. A further 100 acres of vines were planted and winemaker Tom Carson joined the young team. That same year a joint venture was signed with Champagne Devaux, a leading Champagne house in France, to make the now famed Yarrabank sparkling. The Rathbone family made plans for the development of a state-of-the-art winery to accommodate and complement the anticipated increase in winemaking standards.

In recent times, the Yering Station vision has culminated in some exciting recognition with the International Winemaker of the Year at the highly coveted International Wine and Spirit Competition, London in 2004 and the property's induction into the Australian Tourism Awards Hall of Fame in 2006.

Yering Station

Depending on the season, harvest at Yering Station begins around late February / early March and is a bustling, exciting time of year in the vineyards and winery. Fruit arrives freshly picked in the cool of morning and is handled before the heat of the day to ensure optimum flavour is preserved. Depending on its destination, fruit will either go straight through the crusher de-stemmer, or be loaded into one of two air bag presses for a highly controlled and gentle extraction of juice.

As a family-owned winery Yering Station is renowned for producing award-winning wines of world-class quality and distinction and has been recognised for its commitment to excellence. Sometimes particular varieties such as Pinot Noir and Shiraz will be pumped directly into open tank fermenters for the delicate treatment of whole bunch pressing. White and red wines are treated differently once de-stemming has occured. White wines, including Yering Station Sauvignon Blanc, Marsanne, Viognier, Roussanne, Pinot Gris and Chardonnay are placed immediately in the press for extraction of juice and removal from skins.

White wines are then stabilised in stainless steel, temperature controlled vats before movement to oak occurs. All juice spends some period in French oak barriques, from a minimum of one month for the Sauvignon Blanc, to eight months for the Chardonnay. The use of French oak helps to impart flavour and gives an added dimension and character to the wine.

The choice of 100% French oak at Yering Station is made for its gentle flavours which complements the more delicate, cool climate, Yarra Valley fruit. A carefully balanced percentage of slightly aged and new oak, combined with a blend of wild and cultured yeast are trademarks of Chief Winemaker Tom Carson's exacting expertise and sharp instinct when it comes to winemaking.

Yering Station